The Next Adventure

So things moved pretty fast once I got home. I arrived in Choiceland on Wednesday and barely had enough time to recover from my last adventures when my next was set into motion.

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Photo Credit: Tour Guide Canada
I have been trying to sell my car for over a year now, I had felt it was time to move on from it, and right now I am in the process of setting up a new endeavour that will require greater cargo space.  So I threw it up on Kijiji knowing I’d be back soon and before I even arrived in Choiceland I had a guy wanting to come see it. Friday he showed up cash in hand and within a few minutes I was officially without a car. So long little Focus. You were a great ride!

Not long after an alarming fact hit me. I have no car. Uh oh. In Choiceland, no car, limited budget. This could be interesting. Luckily I had already been perusing Kijiji in search of an appropriate vehicle to create VanLife 2.0. Last summer I spent 6 weeks touring Western Canada living out of this beauty and with some of the adventures I have in development for this summer I was anxious to find a vehicle which I could customize to take the Van Life experience to the next level. 2016-05-12 14.45.02

Last years model was comfortable, great for driving but not really set up as a camper and too nice to destroy by camperizing so I decided to sell it at the end of the season and start from scratch this year.

So, As I said, I had already been looking and had found a few contenders, one of which I had messaged about the previous week and hadn’t heard back from. That is until that Thursday before I sold my car, no wanting to get ahead of myself and not wanting to look to eager I waited to call the guy back but now with the sale of my car complete I needed to get things moving.

But was I really going to buy another van? I live an unusual life, I accept that. Most days anyway. Some days I question my own sanity and really facing another summer living in a van is not exactly conducive to being a grown up and there is a part of me that after 2 years of school and 2 months of vagabonding my way around the world is craving stability. However, let’s be real I am pretty good at quieting that part of my soul. In reality, I just said a prayer, the same one I often say “Lord if you want this to happen make it straight and clear” So I set up a meeting for the next day, convinced my fabulous parents to go for a drive, and early the next afternoon we were on our way. Going in I had preconcieved deal breakers all set in my head. I had a price in my head that I wouldn’t budge above and told myself if I had any reservations I would bail immediately and try to forget about this idea. We got there, checked it top to bottom, needs a windshield, pretty dirty, but the right size for what I want to accomplish and really not in bad shape over all. Turn the key and fires right up, take it for a test drive, shifts nice and has V8 power, not bad at all. OK it passed the reservations test. Let’s talk price – “So what are you looking to get out of it?” “Well, I’d take $2500 for it” CRAP THAT’S EXACTLY THE NUMBER I WANTED. Now I debate pushing him further but really that was the price I felt I was going to pay ahead of time and so my response… “Write it up!”

Well looks like I am doing this! The guy selling turned out to be a pretty good dude too. Runs an importing business bringing in tires and batteries from China, gave me a few tips about the process after I mentioned that my new endeavour involves importing. Pretty cool experience all around.

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So now I have a van! My hours of Pinteresting ideas are about to pay off, but where to start? We stopped at Canadian tire on the way home and I picked up some supplies to start with. They had touch up paint and also a power inverter on sale so I picked those up.

The next morning I went at it making a trip into town to get the necessary supplies to add a bed to my new project. Once home, I started ripping the seats out but what a gong show that became, I ended up ripping all of the trim off of the sides to get to the seat belt bolts. Was missing the right tools to take some of the support plates out. By the time it was getting dark I was sitting semi defeated amidst a pile of rubble. (Displayed in the video below lol) SO I decided to give up for the night and run into town the next day for the right tools.

The next morning I went and got the tool I needed got most of the pieces out and then put the trim back on. I haven’t decided yet if I am going to take it right down to steel or if I should work around what is there for now. Working with what is there is more budget friendly, but stripping it will give a way cooler finished product. So will see, I flip flop on the subject daily ha.

But also that morning I got a call from my old accounting firm and they needed some emergency coverage for tax season and knew I was available, so out of that conversation I ended up with a contract doing tax for a couple weeks. Which on my end is a huge blessing. I live pretty low key financially but its been a while since I have had steady work so this will be a great little boost financially. So since then I have just been in Regina, working my buns off trying to raise the start up capital I need for my next venture.

I have also had a few “interesting” opportunities pop up so stay tuned in the next few days who knows where my next post will be from! haha

Cheers for now

Dave

 

 

Malaysia – Dave Life Squared

Originally Posted – March 27, 2017

Upon my departure from Istanbul, I made my way through Abu Dhabi and Kuala Lumpur to my next destination – Penang, Malaysia. 

Within moments of my arrival to Malaysia, I had a new SIM card, pocket full of Malaysian cash and was ready for adventures! The first of which was my very first UBER ride. Yes, I realize I am one of the few people to never have used this service before but man was I impressed. As a traveller I am always nervous in a new city, there are way too many stories of getting ripped off by cabbies at the airport. UBER let me watch the entire drive towards my destination with their real time map, talk about piece of mind. Add in the fact that it was about $10 for a 45 minute drive across the city and we will call that a win. 

Touring around on the back of Dave’s bike, snapping pics as I went

Post UBER experience I arrived at my friends Dave, Tasha and family’s condo which was big, beautiful and way less to rent than mine back home, these expat guys are doing something right I think haha. After getting settled, Dave took me out to a great Chinese place for  dinner and then we just hung out at cool spot on the beach and caught up. Why am I eating Chinese food in Malaysia? Fun Fact: there is a tonne of Chinese influence on Penang as they have heavily invested in the area.

Most of my next day was spent relaxing in Dave’s pool while he worked. The downtime was good as there is a lot to process on this trip. It’s an odd season of life and floating in a pool in a tropical climate is definitely welcomed as I sort out the next moves of my life. We did meet up with a friend of Dave’s for lunch and had awesome bbq steaks and satay for dinner so the day wasn’t without any adventure.

The next morning we went a bit more touristy. Ate breakfast near Dave’s son’s school, I forget the name of what we ordered but it was some Malay dish. After we went the “Wet Market” basically a farmers market/butcher shop, all the fruits and veggies of a typical farmers market but also dead chickens, pigs, fish (I don’t remember if there was beef or not) all being cut up and served direct to customer. Pigs ears hanging from the stalls, fully plucked chickens with their heads still attached, was definitely a sight, but we got our order of chicken breasts and carried on. After dropping off our groceries and a quick stop at home we were off to meet with another connection of Dave’s who is an expat working in the area, was great to hear his experiences as he works with a missions organization throughout South East Asia.  After lunch Dave and I scooted off on his motorbike down to the Georgetown area of Penang, this is an older hippy vibed area that has a bunch of street art. We toured around on a pedal cart and I will do a separate post later with all the art pictures I took as there were a lot. We ended the tour with some delicious cake at a cool spot called China House, sugary goodness for sure. I can’t remember the name of the spot we had dinner that night, I want to call it AVA but not sure. It was cool though, lots of food stalls all in a lot, which let you choose what you wanted that evening, lots of very strange choices and I of course chose something that I had no idea how to pronounce, haha. All in all a super fun filled day!

My last day, we went out for Nazi kandar for lunch, basically a Malaysian form of Indian food. Definitely delicious and like everything else here super cheap. After lunch we spent some time at the mall which I wandered while Dave ran errands, found a very cool marketing exhibit for the LOGAN movie which I will also post separately later. The rest of the day was low key as Dave needed to prep for a speaking engagement he had on the weekend, so I hit up some floating in the pool and then after dinner checked out the night market. Night market was cool lots of little shops selling knock offs of all sorts, picked up a sweet pair of “Raybans”, found a barber and got a fresh cut, and closed it off by finding a Starbucks and strolling my way down the beach. 
The next morning I hopped another UBER to the airport and was Railay Beach bound 🙂

Istanbul – The Next Adventure

To the next adventure and my life’s journey

Originally posted – March 03, 2017

So I started this post just as I took off from Greece. I have now arrived in Istanbul, Turkey spent a looooong night in the airport waiting for delayed friends and a groggy day in the city experiencing it from the point of view of Canadians living there to learn language and culture. Today I’ll be playing the tourist so watch good ole Instagram for my pics (#davelife). It’s already proven to be a beautiful city with incredible people, I can not wait to dive deeper.

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I can without reservation now state that this trip was the correct decision. My time on Lesvos was some of the most heart wrenching, exhausting, awesomeness that I have ever experienced. The opportunity to work along side the team at EuroRelief is one that I will cherish indefinitely. My only regret is that I wish that I had planned to stay longer. I started this journey a month ago relatively unsure that I was making a correct decision but excited for the adventure.  On the outside I maintained confidence and verbally rationalized my decision with ease, on the inside I was far less secure.

I also expected to develop vision for the career path that I am supposed to take. So far however I only have more questions. I keep waiting for a road sign to show up in front of me or the right door to swing open; instead I just have another piece of a bigger puzzle to ponder, and a little voice inside saying “Stay the path”. So as I continue to ponder my future please keep me in your thoughts and prayers (they are always appreciated). I know that the veil will lift eventually, it always does. haha

D

Greece – The Aqueduct Adventure

Originally posted – March 20, 2017

This was a great day. Most of my posts so far have been about the camp and the people that have been a part of my journey and how they affected me. Along the way, in amongst all the hard work and relationships being built I have also had a few fantastic opportunities to be a part of some incredible experiences. As most of you are aware I am an avowed lover of random adventure, I tend to not know what I am doing until I am doing it haha. This day would prove to be no exception…

Our adventure begins the day before as I picked up the rest of the Panagiouda Crew from working the night shift an experience I not so unfortunately missed out on during my time in Moria. (not sure who to thank, Marianna for her scheduling I guess, but anyways I am definitely grateful haha — David is too old for all nighters) During our drive home it was discussed that we all had the following day off and as such an adventure was in order.

The next day I followed up with them to see what was up and within 30 minutes we had a hike planned. Steph and Dusting had driven by random sign along the highway on their previous days adventures that looked like it was a map of hiking trails so they pinned it and we had just been recruited to see where it lead. LOVE IT.

Loaded in the van shortly after we were on our way. Armed only with google maps and an appetite for adventure we toured our way down the winding Lesvos highway towards the pin. As we got closer we noticed a sign that read something about an aqueduct… INTRIGUING but we carried on towards where they had set the pin and finally found the sign they had previously passed.

The sign itself outlined several trails which undoubtedly were beautiful adventures of their own. This entire island is full of the most beautiful landscapes, hilly and filled with lush olive groves, it is truly a sight to be seen. But our eyes all gravitated to one path in particular… the Roman Aqueduct.

Now if I am honest, I had ZERO idea what a Roman Aqueduct looked like or would be but I had a suspicion that it was old, stone, big and most likely VERY COOL, making it easy to sell me on the idea. We circled back to where we had seen the original sign and began our trek into the unknown.

Like everything else in this country, hike towards the Aqueduct was stunning, winding around a small river valley the journey itself was amazing to behold. The quiet of nature, the crispness in the the air and, of course, fantastic company holding great conversation. Though not without any trials, it was super muddy and Sam ended up doing the hike barefoot (2 hours through mud sans shoes thats more than I could have done) but I am sure glad he did because I would have hated for him to miss what we came upon.

As we  travelled further down the path we would get our first glimpses of this marvellous site. Standing for legitimately hundreds of years this astonishing feat of ancient architecture was completely awe inspiring.

As we got closer I felt a little like we were characters in the Lord of the Rings or something, heroes in the midst of an ancient epic quest.

I also learned, for the record, the Romans used aqueducts to move water from the island’s hills into the city’s below. Often they would have to cross a valley to do so and in that these epic aqueducts were built to span the gorge.

I don’t actually know what else to say about this experience. It was humbling and strangely satisfying to be that close to such an enduring piece of history. I was visiting with friends last night discussing our various travels and they were talking about visiting the Coliseum in Rome and the feelings they felt walking in such historically rich setting and I feel like thats a good explanation of how I felt here. I think as humans we have a deeply entrenched desire for legacy that we can too often overlook in our concerns for the here and now and so when we experience this level of physical endurement we cannot help but be somewhat awed by it.

Lol anyways consider that David’s deep thought for the day.

I am also still trying to get some of the footage that Dustin took with his drone. I have a feeling that it would give an even deeper understanding of how incredible this structure is, that photos cant even accurately capture. I’ll post it up, if and when I do.

Until Next time

D

Greece – The Panagiouda Crew

I had to do this post if only to give some honour to the people who made my time in Greece an incredible adventure. I met a tonne of new friends while I was there but this crew and I seemed to have a unique bond, it was like having an instant family. You guys were a blast and totally have a special place in my heart!

From Left to Right: Brit, Steph, Me, Dustin, Sam, Chad

The Wise’s

Dustin Wise – The tall, blonde, surfer dude with a heart of gold. The guy just loves on people, you watch him interact with people you know that he just loves them. Caring, genuine and comfortable he’s one of those guys that you meet for 5 minutes and feel like you have always known. He’s also super talented and creative so if you need a wedding videographer in Cali, look buddy up!

Steph Wise – Dustin’s lovely wife, Steph has a curiosity for adventure. She knows the right questions to ask and is always asking locals and researching what to see and where to eat. She’s responsible for and receives photo cred for the incredible shot of me on the roman aqueduct below. Like myself, she’s an ideas person blessed with vision to use her skills and abilities to help others and has the mind/spirit to make those visions a reality. God has already done some pretty cool things through her and I can not wait to hear what world changing adventure she goes on next.

The Roman Aqueduct we visited, seriously worth the hike!

The Mennonites

Sam, Brittany, and Chad – This trio would be an incomplete package if any one of them were missing. The comic genius that spouts from their mouths, playing off each other, cracking one liners at every opportunity guaranteed a smile on my face every time they were around. I also learned more about Mennonite culture than I ever even knew existed. Three absolute gems.

Sam – Potentially one of the funniest guys I have ever met. Loves God, music, Freeda espressos (did I say that right) and people and probably in that order. He has a strength of character that is impressive for a guy so young. His eye for adventure and willingness to serve are going take him to amazing places. He also loves to tell a good story, which he will have a good one when he tells his fgriends back home about walking miles in bare foot to see a roman aqueduct and not wanting to muddy his shoes. 🙂

Brittany – My favourite line from Brittany “Sam, I just repeat what you say” and being that she does so at the most opportune moments made her hilarious. Sam’s randomness + Brit’s timing = PURE GOLD I’ll just leave it like that. She also totally has a servant heart and was quick to volunteer on camp no matter what the task at hand was.

Chad – Sam’s best friend and proverbial straight man, (also Brittany’s brother)  Sam would be far less funny without Chad, these two are a package deal. Far more subdued than Sam, Chad is more about impact than volume but his value to this crew as a whole was unmistakable.

And more!

Hack – Probably the most laid back guy I have ever met. His sense of peace makes even me look high strung, I didn’t think that was possible Ha! A hard worker and a born leader he accepted responsibility to take leadership with humility and attentive care. While I saw other Compound Supervisors spend a lot of time at the office, on his shifts Hack stayed out with the crew making sure everyone was covered and even the smallest of hiccups attended to. Truly it was an honour to serve alongside this man of God.

Vahid – Dude, you were only there for part of it but I love your heart, man! Keep letting Jesus take you on adventures.

Hallah – Unfortunately Hallah ended up on the opposite shift of the rest of us when the most exciting stuff was happening. Which is sad because she’s this amazing woman who always made it clear she was there with us in spirit even though not often in person.

I could go on and on. The people at EuroRelief were awesome, the girls at the Mytilene Apartment made my mornings so bright as I had the honour of picking up their joyful smiley faces each morning.  The EuroRelief staff are such a solid group too. (Elton I honour you for the hours you put in that go above and beyond your job description. You may not think people notice it but they definitely do, you’re doing great things man). The shift leaders – SO IMPRESSED! Young women and men getting things done in some intense situations. WOW. I don’t think you understand how rare you are. All the YWAMers and i58 crew, brief moments crossing paths but great conversations all over the place.

The Translators – These guys are refugees who are giving their time to help EuroRelief do our job. They get limited perks and put up with a lot of flack, but really its my interactions with these dudes that complete changed the word “refugee” in my heart and mind. It was an honour to work along side of them.

I probably missed someone important. I usually do, so if you are like hey what about me, know it was awesome to meet you, and thank you all for being part of my journey.

David

 

 

Greece – Life at Moria

Hey, thanks so much for checking out my blog! 2017 has already been amazing for me, I spent a month in Greece and another month traveling my way back to Canada. I blogged my way through it but they were on my other site, in an effort to keep everything in one spot, I have moved all my posts here! Hope you enjoy!

4 shifts left!!!! **tear**

I am finally taking a second to write and I cannot believe that I only have 4 shifts left! 😩 That seems so unbelievably crazy to me. It has been a full few weeks and has gotten to the point where in many ways I feel like this place is a part of me. The work is exhausting both physically and emotionally but the people and the community that comes with it are equally beautiful and fulfilling.

2017-02-15 14.36.08 In most of my travels it’s the dichotomy of the situations I get myself into that often impacts me the most and Greece has been no exception. Here we have this beautiful country with thrilling landscapes around every corner and in the middle of it all is the Moria Refugee Camp, a military base and very prisonesque, which currently houses 2,000 or so men from around the world as they anxiously await their decision on asylum. A place many understood would be a few day stop on their journey to a promised land but has become their home for months, gradually and continually deteriorating the hope they once held.

I haven’t posted a lot unfortunately mostly because I come home exhausted and get up with just enough time to hit the pavement for another day. But partially because being here has required a lot of processing and I want to be careful not to unintentionally paint a darker picture of the experience than it deserves. Like most things in life it is often easier to lose sight of the great things that2017-02-06 17.03.48 are occurring as they fade behind the issues we face.
My role at EuroRelief is different everyday it seems which is a bit of an adventure in itself but lets me see if I can list a few of the more dominant roles I have played.
  1. Security – My first days and a couple times this last week I spent watching gates, this is just a security tool for the residents making sure that people who aren’t housed on the level aren’t getting on, it also means distributing food to the different rooms, but mostly it is just hanging out with the guys, speaking broken English/Farsi/Arabic/French etc and laughing at their antics. I also find this a great opportunity to set spiritual atmosphere and in my heart I pray hope over each of them as they come in and out of the gate. It is also often super quiet so I get a lot of reflection here too. It can also be a bit crazy as people are being moved around the camp constantly in an effort to manage the housing at the camp.
  2. Driver – For a time I was the only volunteer with an international license so that kind of solidified my role as a driver for the volunteers. It adds time to my day which if you’ve been here would likely have heard me complain about, and if you’re doddling at the end of your shift have likely experienced #GrumpyDave but all in all the role really added to my experience. I get to spend time with most of Euro’s volunteers and as a result have been blessed to experience first hand the awesome hearts and spirits of these people who are truly an exceptional bunch.
  3. Warehouse personnel – I tried to make myself sound fancy but really I just move boxes, and boxes, and boxes, oh and then some pallets 😛 Managing clothing is one of EuroReliefs roles on the camp and in the ever continuing efforts to improve processes they have been doing a lot of work wit2017-02-16 11.13.55h organizing the donations they receive. And then in the middle of it all they received 24 pallets of winter gear and have to sort what is worth keeping for next year (as it is spring here now) and what to get rid of. Let me tell ya that was a fun few days haha but with a view like below its tough to complain too much.
  4. Info Staff – Sounds simple… hahaha not so much, this is where daily random adventures begin. Yes it can be slow at times but more often than not the words “I need someone for a job” ring out from the shift leader and you get drafted in for an adventure. Usually, it involves moving people from one housing unit to another or checking some simple information or tracking down a resident, but other times the adventure is much greater.  One of my favourites was the distribution of 120 bunkbeds into the big tents. Prior to this the guys were sleeping on the floor so you would expect that actual beds would be greeted with joy. Not so much though as many of these guys had built quite comfortable quarters for themselves and were not excited to destroy2017-02-15 14.38.58 their current accommodation to make room for the new. Add in some trust issues that the beds were actually coming and the short notice and boom EXCITEMENT haha. Once they saw the beds and we started bringing them in MORE EXCITEMENT as we can only bring in 10 at a time and theres always a bit of concern that not everyone will get one. And then once word has gotten out that the area has beds others who aren’t supposed to be in the tent have come in to try and lay claim to them creating a shortage. MORE EXCITEMENT. But like most things in Moria the excitement is short lived and the next day everything had returned to calm. These men live in a state of limbo so I understand completely why they get upset when things get shaken a bit as they are simply trying to hold on to any resemblance of a normal life.
So thats a brief look at my day to day. I’ll try and post again in the next few days as my processing of this experience continues. I head to Turkey on Wednesday which will allow me some recuperation time as well as an opportunity to dialogue with friends outside the situation which will undoubtedly provide new levels of revelation.
I also NEED to do a post specifically devoted to my Panagiouda Crew! My trip would not have been complete with out these guys they are truly kindred spirits to my adventurous heart and I have been so ABSOLUTELY blessed to have them in my life.
As this chapter closes I definitely do not want to leave though. I have gotten to see a change in Moria over the past few weeks and am proud for my tiny part in it. There is so much brokenness but as things are improving my hope is the men will see the hope ahead as well.
Please continue to pray for Moria, for the hearts of the men inside who fight hopelessness, for our world leaders to see refugees as an opportunity not a penance, for the workers in the field that energy would hold for the ones who are here and more would answer the call to this incredible experience.
Chat Soon
D

Greece – Touring Panagiouda

Hey, thanks so much for checking out my blog! 2017 has already been amazing for me, I spent a month in Greece and another month traveling my way back to Canada. I blogged my way through it but they were on my other site, in an effort to keep everything in one spot, I have moved all my posts here! Hope you enjoy!

Oh wow, now where did I leave off…

To start, I actually tried to write this post yesterday on my day off but inadvertently deleted all of my photos off my camera from this trip so far and from my VanLife adventure last summer and spent the next few hours figuring out how to recover the pictures, which I did manage to do with the exception of 3 or 4 which corrupted along the way. If there are any tech savvy people out there that know how to fix a corrupted photo you would be my hero if you can show me how to get those ones back too.

The first photos are from my nice long relaxing walk along the seawall my first day off. I needed groceries so went for a bit of a journey on foot and really got to take in some of this beautiful town. Panagiouda is about the size of Choiceland but its also something like 600 years old and everything is made of beautiful stone. Even the side walks are stone, lol and potentially 600 years old judging by their condition in some spots but it was still a great walk. The latter 2 shots are the larger town of Mytilene a hopping little tourist/university town with FABULOUS gelato (#DaveLife on Instagram for proof).

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It’s been a looooong week. I cannot believe its actually only been a week that I have been here as I write this. But it has also been incredible. The people we interact with have been through so much it is an honour to serve and try and make their time here a bit more comfortable. Most of the migrants and refugees who are here expected to only be here a couple days, many of those have been here 6 months or more, waiting to move on.

My time on camp these past couple days has been spent in an area called the Olive Grove. Technically outside of the camp it houses many of the refugees from African countries. It makes me miss my crew back at Matthew House as many are from the same countries Burundi/Congo etc. It also gives me the chance to work on my French though they speak way to fast and with way to thick of an accent for me to really catch what they are saying. Ha!

#MG_5120#MG_5121

One of my roles has also been as driver, which has been an adventure of its own. The Greeks they drive aggressive thats for sure and the streets don’t exactly line up in straight lines like back in good ole SK haha, combine that with a serious lack of street signs and a phone whose GPS is outta whack and oh boi! It’s been a bit of a gong show at points. Now at least I have a local SIM though and getting more and more used to the streets by the day.

I also had a day off but it was rainy and my chest cold told me to be lazy so it didn’t hold much adventure unfortunately. I do feel a heck of a lot better though. Oh and we had a little bible study thing last night too for the EuroRelief staff.  Was great to spend some time with people outside of the camp setting where there is a lot more ability to relax and honestly converse. It’s a really good crew that they have going here. PLUG MOMENT: If you or someone you know wants to get deeper involved with whats happening here check them out by clicking here

#MG_5122#MG_5123
Anyways I finally have my hot water fixed so I am about to check out for the night.
Ciao till next time
D

Greece – The first impressions

Hey, thanks so much for checking out my blog! 2017 has already been amazing for me, I spent a month in Greece and another month traveling my way back to Canada. I blogged my way through it but they were on my other site, in an effort to keep everything in one spot, I have moved all my posts here! Hope you enjoy!

Three days in!

Well friends and fam, I am three days into my Greek adventure and down with a chest cold/jet lag. I am by no means incapacitated but having a good number of staff today, my scheduler took pity on this poor soul and gave a day of rest. Hopefully, this bonus sleep will do my body good enough that I can hit the ground running again tomorrow. I am not a fan of running on low.
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How’s Camp? I have loved my first experiences here though at times they can be intense. You learn quick and EuroRelief is staffed by an incredible army of volunteers, many of them are young and fairly inexperienced but you would never guess it for a moment when you are on the ground. Countless times I have asked the question to the “veteran” staff, “how long have you been here?” only to be shocked with an answer of “Oh about 2 weeks” WOW Seriously! Anyone who quips a negative about todays generation of young people needs to come check these kids out. Seriously, I am so incredibly impressed with how well they work. They are an organized well oiled machine. The majority of the volunteers are YWAMers on the outreach portion of their program being lead by a determined staff of EuroRelief long termers. It has been honouring as a new comer/outsider to see how they come together to accomplish the tasks they face.
My time so far has been spent working at a security gate which can be intense at times (I get upset when someone stands between me and my ability to go to bed too, so I get it) but it has also been super rewarding, as working the gate gives you the opportunity to interact with pretty much every person who lives on that level. It has been a great reminder of our ability to set the spiritual atmosphere through internal prayer and external love poured out on these guys. The bible says “pray without ceasing” its in moments like these that you truly understand the benefits and importance of this discipline.
Through this I have also had the privilege to meet and seriously converse with a few of the refugees. Too often in North America we hear the word refugee and it conjures up images of war and terrorism and all of those connected fears, which is alarmingly sad as by definition these people are the complete opposite. They were made refugee by fleeing war/terror. They are just men/women/children caught in the middle of a war none of them supports and none of them want any part of. They have given up everything just for the opportunity of peace. And I can with all honesty say, you would never choose to live this life unless given no other option.
The issues faced in Syria and the rest of the middle east are so incredibly complicated, but I was able to find a video that helps describe what is happening give it a look and you will soon understand how unbelievably complex this situation is.
Till next time
David